COFFEE PREPARATION – ESPRESSO

1. GRIND AND MEASURE

Grind the beans at espresso grind size in a burr grinder. If you don’t have a burr grinder, grind in brief, sharp pulses in a blade grinder, stopping every couple seconds to invert the grinder and give it a sharp shake while holding the lid on.

A regular, single shot is made with around 0.24-0.28 oz. (7-8 grams) of ground coffee. Start with the standard to get a decent shot, and then experiment your way to the desired strength

2. PREPARE
Espresso is brewed at 195 °F to 205 °F, (90 °C – 96 °C). Some espresso machines need a warm up before pulling the shot. If your machine doesn’t have that in its program, just pull a blank shot.

3. MAKE YOUR COFFEE

Tamp with around 20 lb to 30 lb pressure. But this is only if you want to play around. Most baristas will keep the tamping at 30 lb pressure and adjust the grind until they find the sweet spot.

3. POUR AND ENJOY

We recommend you serve your espresso in porcelain espresso cups or glass cups with a double wall because they maintain optimal coffee temperature for a longer period as well as the foam and flavor. For best, the cups need to be warmed up before pulling the shot.

Drink a few sips of water before your espresso to erase any previous taste memories from your taste buds.

Mix a bit in your espresso before the first sip, even if you don’t add sugar, this will ensure that the first drink is not a bitter one. Some add sugar to their espresso, others eat a biscotti or any other cookies with their espresso, others will just drink it as it is, plain.

A properly prepared espresso is vaguely fruity, floral, slightly sweet, and reminiscent of chocolate and caramel tones. Bitterness is a quality sign only if it’s gently weighted by a little acidity.